Realm Blog

Building Modern Swift Apps with Realm Database

We love that the Realm development community at large is so, so good at taking existing code and content and iterating on it to make great things even better. That’s why we’re pleased (and humbled!) to let you know about a new book that covers Realm development in the iOS world: Read more about it here.

Why a book about Realm? Sure, the Realm API docs are quite complete, and the tutorials from the Academy do a great job at giving you hands-on experience at integrating Realm into your apps. But the nice thing about this book is that it pulls all of those concepts together in one place, and takes you all the way from foundational concepts to building out multiple apps that leverage Realm just as you would in your real-world projects.

Author Marin Todorov recognized early on that there just wasn’t a good, comprehensive resource for “all things Realm” — so he wrote his own resource. That eventually turned into the book “Realm: Building Modern Swift Apps with Realm Database”, which, as far as we know, is the only complete book about developing modern Realm apps against iOS.

“Finally, a book that doesn't feel like homework! Right off the bat, the book shows you how to add basic Realm capabilities to your app. The further down the rabbit hole you go, the more advanced Realm features you'll discover.” — Gabriel Rosinski, iOS Developer

It’s easy to throw around numbers and stats, like our installed product base, the ever-growing number of developers who have adopted Realm in their projects, or even the stars on our GitHub repo. But when someone cares enough about your platform to sit down at their desk, put the digital equivalent of pen to paper, and write an actual book about your product to share with other developers? That’s humbling, and shows us that what we’re doing here at Realm is really making a difference in your day-to-day development.

In this book, you’ll take an app-centric view of working with the various features of Realm in real-world app scenarios. You’ll cover common use cases with the platform; dig into schemas and relationships; learn about the built-in notification APIs; manage Realm configurations; handle dependency injection and testing; and implement some solid migrations strategies that all showcase the great features that Realm has to offer the modern app developer.

“Marin and the RW team wrote the ultimate Realm guide. From the basics: how it differs from Core Data, how to model the data, and have the UI reacting to changes; up to more advanced scenarios: syncing data with the Realm Cloud and multi-threading. This book covers everything an iOS developer needs in order to write simple or complex apps using Realm, and I totally recommend it!” — Natan Rolnik, Kik

And as a bonus, the final chapter in the book is a great resource for getting up and running with Realm Cloud with a minimum of fuss. It covers data access, synced Realm providers, partial sync, how to manage your sync subscriptions, and more. Although talking about Realm Platform could easily fill its own book, this bonus chapter has everything you need to get started with real-time sync.

The book is from the folks over at http://www.raywenderlich.com, who also have some great written and video resources about Realm. As part of the launch event around this book, they’re offering the book to the Realm community at a discount for a limited time. We’d suggest that you head over and grab the book while the discount is still live; it ends on Friday, April 27. You can get the book here:

Read more about it here

We’d love to know what you think of the book. If there’s something you think that could benefit from being covered in a book like this, let us know and we’ll pass it along!


Marin Todorov

Marin Todorov is an independent iOS consultant and publisher. He’s co-author on the book “RxSwift: Reactive programming with Swift” the author of “iOS Animations by Tutorials”. He’s part of Realm and raywenderlich.com. Besides crafting code, Marin also enjoys blogging, writing books, teaching, and speaking. He sometimes open sources his code. He walked the way to Santiago.

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